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that has something to doith iran and something else to do with the u.n. nuclear watchdog group called the iaea. just for some context here earlier this week we told you members of the iaea, which is the nuclear watchdog group for the u.n., getting their e-mails and information hacked. all signs pointed that iran was behind that. we also reported to you yesterday that the associated press has a diagram from supposedly inside iran that showed iran wanting to develop a nuclear weapon that would be three times as powerful as hiroshima. today what we're getting crossing on the wires right now the united states effectively set a march deadline for iran to start cooperating with the iaea and let the inspectors into the country for full access. the united states diplomat says if they do not do this, if iran does not start cooperating they are going to recommend that the u.n. security council take this up. now what that means and whether or not that is a credible threat to get iran to start working with this group is a big question. time will only tell. the timeline is of the utmost importance
. jon: several republican lawmakers are toning down their criticism of u.n. ambassador susan rice and her handling of the deadly attack on the consulate in libya. ambassador rice was under fire for appearances on the television immediately after the attack where she blamed it on the youtube video. many vocal critics, like senator john mccain are turning up the heat on president obama and the state department. >> the problem is the president of the united states in a debate with mitt romney said that he had said it was a terrorist attack. he hadn't. jon: chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington. she has more on all of this. so this shift in focus to the state department, what are we learning about that, catherine? report thank you, jon, and good morning. we may learn early as this week when secretary of state hillary clinton will testify on capitol hill about the warnings and intelligence leading up to the 9/11 attack on the consulate. on sunday talk shows leading republicans pointed to what they believe is the culpability of clinton's state departm
continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign by ahe grewing to go on the sunday shows to present the administration's position. jenna: senator collins is less outspoken than others is echoing the other republican senators who said they have concerns about the possible nomination of ambassador rice for secretary of state in the wake of some of her comments about what exactly prompted the terror attack on our consulate in the benghazi that led to the murders of four americans on 9/11. collins says she needs more information as you just heard before she will decide whether to support any nomination. of course as a hypothetical nomination. we don't even know if it is coming or not. ambassador rice is also scheduled to meet with republican senator bob corker of tennessee today. when we get his comments we'll bring those to you as well. jon: we will definitely stay on top of that story. a frightening development in the iran nuclear standoff. word that scien
going forward, rick. rick: conor powell live on the ground in jerusalem, thanks. heather: well, u.n. ambassador susan rice defending those early comments on the benghazi terror attacks just days after the raid on the u.s. consulate. ambassador rice went on five sunday talk shows and said that the attack grew out of a spontaneous to protest over an anti-muslim film. and now she says those remarks were based on the intelligence she was given. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. heather: national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live from washington with the latest. hi, jennifer. >> reporter: hi, heather. well, essentially, she came out now was it's increasingly -- because it's increasingly clear that the president wants to nominate her to be his next secretary of state despite strong objections from senators such as john mccain. >> i have
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4